THE SIMPLE LIFE ON OUR OZARKS QUAIL FARM

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MISSOURI OZARKS, United States
After I retired I wanted to stay busy on our farm. My almost 30 year career was in the hunting & fishing industry, so raising the birds I had hunted for years was a natural for me. Being married to my best friend, wife & help mate is all I could ask for. My wife of 34 years and I love living on our farm and doing the chores it takes to maintain it. We are living a wonderful slow life in our retirement. Our grand daughter is such joy. Having a big garden to feed us, raising bees for honey, loving our pets and no debt. I feel blessed to have enjoyed this country living and sustaining our family through growing our food and simple ways my whole life. I am happy to see others across this great country deciding to live instead of just collecting more. A less-stress farm life is making us very happy. *******************************************************

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Moving Birds to Flypens

Our first hatch of quail is now 8 weeks and ready to transfer to flypens.  Our brooder barns are setup so all we have to do is open a small door at one end and the quail exit to the flypens. We are putting 900 - 1000 quail per pen. June was the 5th driest month on record so we really have to watch our waterers.  I am adding an extra waterer to each pen just to be on the safe side. Our feeders need filled every 4 days only. The flypens are shaded until 11:00 each morning.  They have full sun until 4 p.m. so we make sure the birds have plenty of cover to retreat from the heat.  We also run a water mister every couple days. I will be getting another big batch of eggs in a couple of days to set.  I spoke with my egg supplier and his birds aren't laying as good as wanted in this heat so he is having to short a lot of his orders.  I put my order in with him very early last year so I am first on his list.  This ain't my first rodeo. Lack of rain has really hurt the gardens, but we still are harvesting.  Tomatos about ready. Green beans coming on. Shaun checked his bees and thought there was about 80 pounds of honey in the hive.  Should put up a lot this season. Feed prices actually dropped last week due to corn, soybean futures dropping. I hope that continues.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Nice pics. Just browsing and passing through. Good read also.