THE SIMPLE LIFE ON OUR OZARKS QUAIL FARM

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MISSOURI OZARKS, United States
After I retired I wanted to stay busy on our farm. My almost 30 year career was in the hunting & fishing industry, so raising the birds I had hunted for years was a natural for me. Being married to my best friend, wife & help mate is all I could ask for. My wife of 34 years and I love living on our farm and doing the chores it takes to maintain it. We are living a wonderful slow life in our retirement. Our grand daughter is such joy. Having a big garden to feed us, raising bees for honey, loving our pets and no debt. I feel blessed to have enjoyed this country living and sustaining our family through growing our food and simple ways my whole life. I am happy to see others across this great country deciding to live instead of just collecting more. A less-stress farm life is making us very happy. *******************************************************

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Farm Happenings

I visit a diner for breakfast coffee a few miles from us a couple times a week. It's a good way to get out and visit with other local farmers. The extreme heat has just got everyone in a bad mood. It seemed to be a fairly good hay season and the dairy guys are making some money. Cattle & horses are hunkered around the ponds. Chickens aren't laying very well. There just isn't much talk around the table. We try not to talk politics, but we all are sick of the way our leaders are acting.  Inflation has hit us all hard, both for farm things and our home goods.  Although my feed bill has gone down per 100 quite a bit the last month. A good corn & soybean yield has helped that. But everything else from the pine chips I place in the brooder barns floors to the electric and propane costs have gone up a lot.  We are having trouble with black snakes getting into our brooder barns and eating a few quail chicks. I don't want to kill them.  They do a good job on mice, but it gets expensive to feed them $4.00 quail so we take them off to another area. Birds in fly pens are growing and we aren't losing any to heat. We built a lot of good covers and have lots of water available for them.  I suspect a lot of growers are going to be short on the numbers of quail they were hoping to raise.  I will be a few. The guys that sell eggs are not getting very good production which in turn hurts the numbers for all of us.
I will bet that when the season gets here it will be hard to get birds from any of us if they haven't pre-ordered from us. 

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